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Record No: Res 31826    Version: Council Bill No:
Type: Resolution (Res) Status: Adopted
Current Controlling Legislative Body City Clerk
On agenda: 7/30/2018
Ordinance No:
Title: A RESOLUTION relating to the Seattle Center City Bike Network; establishing an implementation schedule for Seattle Department of Transportation delivery of capital projects that are elements of the Center City Bike Network; and requesting quarterly status updates to the Chair of the Sustainability and Transportation Committee through 2019.
Sponsors: Mike O'Brien
Attachments: 1. Att B - Contextual Guidance for High-Comfort Bicycle Facilities, December 2017
Supporting documents: 1. Att A - Seattle City Center Bike Network Map, 2. Summary and Fiscal Note, 3. Proposed Substitute v3 (added; 7/31/18), 4. Proposed Substitute v2 (updated; 7/30/18), 5. Presentation, 6. Signed Resolution 31826

CITY OF SEATTLE

RESOLUTION __________________

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A RESOLUTION relating to the Seattle Center City Bike Network; establishing an implementation schedule for Seattle Department of Transportation delivery of capital projects that are elements of the Center City Bike Network; and requesting quarterly status updates to the Chair of the Sustainability and Transportation Committee through 2019. 

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WHEREAS, the safety, health, economic, environmental, space efficiency, and equity benefits of bicycling as a viable form of transportation, and investing in safe bike infrastructure that is comfortable for people of all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities, are well established, and reflected in city transportation, climate and land use policies; and

WHEREAS, the effects of climate change have a disproportionate impact on communities of color, negatively affecting family and public health outcomes; and

WHEREAS, in 2013 The City of Seattle (City) adopted the Climate Action Plan, which recommends prioritizing transit, walking, and biking over auto travel, with a goal to triple the amount of bicycling from 2007 levels by 2017; and

WHEREAS, in 2014 the City adopted the Bicycle Master Plan, to create a citywide connected network of cycle tracks, protected bike lanes, trail, and greenways with a goal of quadrupling ridership by 2030; and

WHEREAS, demographic information shows that current ridership correlates with current demographics across the city, except by gender, where there is an overrepresentation of male-identified riders, which survey data shows is due to a lack of safe options for cycling; and

WHEREAS, studies have found that Black and Latinx cyclists make up a rapidly growing segment of the riding population; and

WHEREAS, a recent study found that barriers to cycling include that fewer than 20 percent of adult Black and Latinx cyclists and non-cyclists feel comfortable in existing bicycle lanes, and that adult Black and Latinx cyclists and non-cyclists have an increased fear of exposure to theft or assault or being targeted for enforcement; and

WHEREAS, long-standing dis-investment in street infrastructure means that Black and Latinx riders are disproportionately likely to be killed by a car compared to their white counterparts; and

WHEREAS, in 2015 the City adopted a Vision Zero policy and plan, with a goal of achieving zero traffic fatalities and serious injuries by 2030; and

WHEREAS, in 2016 the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) adopted the Center City Bike Network, with a goal of implementing a connected, protected bicycle lane network in downtown Seattle by 2020; and

WHEREAS, the 2016 City Comprehensive Plan sets non-single-occupancy-vehicle (non-SOV) mode share goals for downtown work and non-work trips as 85 percent and 90 percent, respectively; and

WHEREAS, in late 2016 implementation of the Center City Bike Network was put on hold while the City partnered with transit agencies and other stakeholders to develop the One Center City near-term recommendation for mobility in downtown Seattle; and

WHEREAS, SDOT collaborated with King County Metro, Sound Transit, and the Downtown Seattle Association to identify near-term transportation improvements to assist in managing the large volume of simultaneous construction projects through the Center City between 2019 and 2021, as part of the One Center City initiative; and

WHEREAS, the 2017 One Center City recommendations included a two-way protected bike lane on 4th Avenue to be implemented in 2018; and

WHEREAS, in April 2018 the City announced the delay of the 4th Avenue two-way protected bike lane until 2021; and

WHEREAS, in 2018 an all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities bike infrastructure route is still needed to connect from downtown to surrounding neighborhoods in the south, north, and east; and

WHEREAS, connecting routes to surrounding neighborhoods, and between neighborhoods, particularly in historically neglected communities with higher needs of safety improvements for pedestrians and cyclists must be a focus for the city in making connections with the Center City Bike Network; and

WHEREAS, between 2019 and 2021 downtown Seattle is expected to experience the “period of maximum constraint” in which traffic congestion on downtown streets is anticipated to peak, increasing the need for safe, efficient transportation options to manage individual trips and minimize overall congestion; and

WHEREAS, in 2016 City Council allocated in the 2017 City budget $5 million ($1 million in 2017 and $4 million in 2018) to accelerate buildout of the Center City Bike Network; and

WHEREAS, in 2016, as part of the City’s purchase of the Pronto bikeshare system, a City Council proviso required that SDOT demonstrate that the 9th Ave N Protected Bike Lane (Westlake Ave N to Denny Way) be on schedule to be completed prior to an expansion of the bike share system; and

WHEREAS, in 2017, and upon the dissolution of the Pronto bikeshare system, Mayor Murray committed $1.25 million in funding, including to complete a missing link of the 4th Avenue bicycle lane and planning for the extension to Vine Street and accelerating design and outreach for the east/west connections in the Center City bicycle network, both of which were set to begin in 2017; and

WHEREAS, in 2018 the Washington State Convention Center Community Benefits Package included $16 million for building protected bike lanes on Pike/Pine and 8th Ave, and that funding will be available by mid-2018; and

WHEREAS, in Resolution 31814 the Council requested quarterly written reports “on the implementation and performance of the One Center City program through 2021”; and

WHEREAS, implementation of the Center City Bike Network must be coordinated with the rest of the Once Center City near-term recommendations; NOW, THEREFORE,

BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SEATTLE, THAT:

Section 1. The City of Seattle commits to establishing an “all ages and abilities” bicycle connection to serve all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities from the Westlake Cycle Track, through Downtown Seattle, to the intersection of 2nd Avenue South and South Main Street, with the following missing connections completed no later than December 31, 2019, as approximately shown in Attachment A to this resolution:

A. Protected bike lanes heading in the northbound and southbound directions on 9th Avenue North from Harrison Street to Denny Way;

B. Protected bike lanes heading in the northbound and southbound directions on Bell Street from Denny Way to 7th Avenue;

C. A one-way protected bike lane on 7th Avenue from Bell Street to Blanchard Street;

D. A one-way protected bike lane on 8th Avenue from Bell Street to Pine Street. An approved conceptual design for the segment between Pine Street and Pike Street will be complete by December 31, 2018 in coordination with King County Metro and the Washington State Convention Center;

E. A one-way protected bike lane on Pike Street from 6th Avenue to 8th Avenue;

F. A one-way protected bike lane on Pine Street from 8th Avenue to 7th Avenue;

G. Signage at Pine Street and 4th Avenue installed by December 31, 2018 to guide people on bikes safely through the intersection. A one-way protected bike lane on Pine Street from 5th Avenue to 4th Avenue is expected to be completed in 2021 with the Pike Pine Renaissance; and

H. A two-way protected bike lane on 2nd Avenue Extension from South Washington Street to South Main Street.

Section 2. The City of Seattle commits to establishing an “all ages and abilities” connection to serve all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities from the intersection of South Main Street and the 2nd Avenue Extension to Dearborn Avenue S by no later than December 31, 2019. In advancing this connection, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) is requested to complete outreach and approved conceptual design by no later than May 31, 2019.

Section 3. The City of Seattle commits to establishing an “all ages and abilities” connection to serve all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities from the Second Avenue protected bike lane to the Broadway Avenue protected bike lane, by no later than December 31, 2019 (with SDOT’s outreach and approved conceptual design completed by no later than December 31, 2018), as shown in Attachment A to this resolution and consisting of the following:

A. Two one-way protected bike lanes on Pike Street, Pine Street, or a combination thereof from Bellevue Avenue to Broadway Avenue; and

B. An interim facility on Pike Street and Pine Street from 8th Avenue to Bellevue Avenue during the Convention Center construction; and

Section 4. Where permanent connections described in Sections 1 through 3 of this resolution may be limited due to construction activities, the Seattle Department of Transportation is requested to make every good faith effort to establish “all ages and abilities" temporary connections, such as, but not limited to:

A. Working with developers and adjacent property owners in revising traffic control plans to accommodate bicycle travel in addition to pedestrians; or

B. Creating bicycle paths using existing adjacent right-of-way and temporary barriers to separate bicycles and vehicular traffic.

Section 5. The City of Seattle commits to completing 100 percent design for a two-way protected bike lane on Fourth Avenue between South Main Street and Vine Street by no later than May 31, 2019.

Section 6. The City of Seattle commits to completing a 100 percent design for an “all ages and abilities” facility to serve all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities on Bell Street between 2nd Avenue and Denny Street, by no later than December 31, 2019. The facility will be a two-way protected bike lane on Bell Street from Denny Street to 5th Avenue. The segment from 5th Avenue to 2nd Avenue will have additional traffic calming to facilitate an “all ages and abilities connection”.

Section 7. The City of Seattle commits to establishing a neighborhood greenway from 5th Avenue S to 12th Avenue S along King St, by no later than December 31, 2019.

Section 8. The City of Seattle commits to establishing an “all ages and abilities” connection to serve all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities from Yesler Way to King St, along 12th Avenue S, by no later than December 31, 2019.

Section 9. The City Council requests an update to the Traffic Control Manual for In-Street Work to be implemented by no later than September 1st, 2018.  This update shall provide guidance for addressing work that encroaches upon a bike lane, bike trail, shared lane, signed bike route or a road or sidewalk commonly used by bicyclists. An accessible, safe, and clearly defined route shall be provided, and maximum effort shall be made to provide a convenient bicycle way separate from active work areas.

Section 10. The City Council requests that SDOT provide quarterly written reports to City Council on the progress of the commitments made in this resolution at the start of each calendar quarter, from September 1, 2018 through the end of 2019.  The report should include SDOT’s evaluation of the performance of the transportation system with the implemented bicycle infrastructure projects. The report may be combined with the One Center City quarterly report, requested by Resolution 31814. 

Section 11. The City Council requests that SDOT follow the design guidance of the “Designing for All Ages & Abilities” report of the National Association of City Transportation Officials as shown in Attachment B, in the design of the “all ages and abilities” facilities described in this Resolution.

Section 12.  The City Council recognizes that SDOT will make decisions about which projects to build within the overall context of meeting the One Center City goal of moving people safely and efficiently through Center City to serve all ages, languages, ethnicities, gender, race and abilities.

 

Adopted by the City Council the ________ day of _________________________, 2018, and signed by me in open session in authentication of its adoption this ________ day of _________________________, 2018.

____________________________________

President ____________ of the City Council

Filed by me this ________ day of _________________________, 2018.

____________________________________

Monica Martinez Simmons, City Clerk

(Seal)

 

 

 

Attachment:

Attachment A - Seattle City Center Bike Network Map, July 6, 2018

Attachment B - Designing for All Ages & Abilities, Contextual Guidance for High-Comfort Bicycle Facilities, December 2017