Office of the City Clerk: Home
City of Seattle
Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Bookmark and Share
Record No: CB 119120    Version: Council Bill No: CB 119120
Type: Ordinance (Ord) Status: Passed
Current Controlling Legislative Body City Clerk
On agenda: 11/20/2017
Ordinance No: Ord 125470
Title: AN ORDINANCE relating to organization of the Office for Civil Rights; amending Section 3.14.910 of the Seattle Municipal Code to change removal from at-will to for-cause for subsequent Directors of the Office for Civil Rights.
Sponsors: Lisa Herbold
Supporting documents: 1. Summary and Fiscal Note, 2. Summary Att A – SOCR Racial Equity Analysis Implementation Plan, 3. Signed Ord_125470, 4. Affidavit of Publication
Related files: GS 386-1-A-1-2018
CITY OF SEATTLE
ORDINANCE __________________
COUNCIL BILL __________________
title
AN ORDINANCE relating to organization of the Office for Civil Rights; amending Section 3.14.910 of the Seattle Municipal Code to change removal from at-will to for-cause for subsequent Directors of the Office for Civil Rights.
body
WHEREAS, the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR) works to advance civil rights and end barriers to equity; and
WHEREAS, in 2004, The City of Seattle (City) launched a Race and Social Justice Initiative (RSJI), led by SOCR, to implement its longstanding commitments to social justice and ending racism1; and
WHEREAS, the goal of RSJI is to end institutional racism within City government, working toward a vision where racial disparities will be eliminated and racial equity achieved; and
WHEREAS, the Seattle City Council unanimously adopted Resolution 31164 on November 30, 2009, affirming the City's RSJI and directing City departments to use available tools to end racial inequities across key indicators of success; and
WHEREAS, on April 3, 2014, Mayor Ed Murray issued Executive Order 2014-02, reaffirming the City's commitment to RSJI and racial equity in education, equitable development, criminal justice, health, housing, jobs, the environment, service equity and arts and culture2; and
WHEREAS, the 2016 RSJI Community Survey, found that people who live, work, or go to school in Seattle continue to face racial inequities in nearly every indicator of well-being and 53 percent of all Black/African American survey respondents said they are not experiencing economic opportunities; people of color and transgender respondents were more likely to say their neighborhoods are unhealthy places to live; close to half of all American Indian/Alaska Native respondents do not feel they have benefited from Seattle's environmental progress; 56.1 percent of Black/African American and 47 percent of American Indian/Alaska Native respondents have little to no confidence in ...

Click here for full text